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On renaming Hawaii

De-memorializing the violence of colonial imperialism by abandoning the names of oppressors currently commemorated in our street, school and place names.

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Tyler Greenhill
Neighbor island data confirms houselessness on the rise

The state released the neighbor island data from its 2015 Point in Time count today and, in all counties but Kauai, the number of houseless citizens has increased.

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Will Caron
Republican reps ask Souki to stand down on ethics commission complaint

State reps. Ward and McDermott say the speaker has overstepped his authority, praise commission's executive director, Les Kondo, for his firm enforcement of the state ethics code.

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Will Caron
Fast track advances slowly, returns to Senate

A bill that would authorize the White House to "fast track" the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, but which does not include protections for displaced American workers, narrowly passed the House today and will cross-over to the Senate where it will face an uphill battle.

The U.S. House narrowly passed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) fast track legislation today by a vote of 218 to 208. The bill must now return to the Senate where it faces mounting opposition.

Last Friday, fast track legislation stalled in the House, in large part, because it was paired with Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), a program intended to support workers displaced by the increased emphasis on a globalized economy that would invariably come along with a trade agreement like the TPP. The Sierra Club calls the TAA language “inadequate.”

The House separated TAA language out from the fast track bill and attached fast track to an unrelated bill on the retirement benefits of firefighters and law enforcement officials. Twenty-eight democrats joined 190 republicans to vote for fast tracking the TPP.

However, the fight is not over yet. The Senate version of the fast track bill, which passed, was paired with TAA language. But, now, senators will be voting on a stand-alone fast track bill that does not include TAA language. A number of senators who previously voted for fast track are expected to vote no to a fast track bill that does not include such language.

“I do not support what’s coming over from the House,” said Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA). “I voted for something that had laid-off workers from trade getting assistance and so that’s a very important component.”

The Sierra Club and other organizations opposed to the TPP will be campaigning to convince swing senators to vote no on the House bill. They expect to be successful, particularly because now there is no clear path within the bill to support workers displaced by the effects of the proposed TPP agreement.

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Will Caron
Study shows sit-lie laws have worsened Honolulu’s houseless problem

A new study shows the city's policy of “compassionate disruption” and its accompanying sit-lie laws cause significant property and economic loss, physical and psychological harm and very likely violate certain constitutional rights. Not only that, they make it much harder for houseless people to get off the streets and into permanent housing.

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Will Caron
It’s not okay to be dumb, haole

A response to Sylvia Dahlby's May 18th op-ed in Civil Beat

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Bianca Isaki
Senate dems push for foreign policy shifts

U.S. Senators Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i), Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), and Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) have released new, "forward-looking" foreign policy principles that they hope will do a better job guiding America in its role as a global leader in the 21st Century.

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Gov. Ige to sign nation’s first 100 percent renewable energy requirement

All of Hawaii's electricity must be produced from solar, wind, geothermal, and other clean energy sources, before 2045.

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Mauna Kea lawsuit heads to Hawaii Supreme Court

The Hawaiʻi Supreme Court now has two telescope-related lawsuits on its plate, the other being the Solar Telescope case on Maui.

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Will Caron