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Growing demand for OHA scholarships

Number of students relying on OHA scholarships for college, percent of expenses covered by scholarships both increased this year.

The number of students receiving college scholarships from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) rose about 15 percent this year, according to the state agency. The average scholarship amount for the 354 Native Hawaiian students who were eligible for funding from OHA this year was $2,458.

Together, they earned a combined total of $870,000 in scholarship money to help pay for college in a time of rising tuition costs. This funding brought the total amount of college scholarship money that OHA has given out over the past five years to about $3.5 million.

The agency says that Native Hawaiian students are leaning more and more heavily on financial aid from OHA, where they have been turning to cover up to 25 percent of their college expenses.

Despite the growing demand, the agency said in a press release that, “Helping Native Hawaiian students pay for college remains a high priority at OHA, whose goals include increasing the number of Native Hawaiian students who graduate college with the marketable skills they need to support themselves and their families.”

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Will Caron
Hawai‘i County declared Ag disaster zone

In the wake of Iselle, Hawai‘i County's agriculture industry was adversely impacted to the point that the USDA declared the island a major disaster zone today.

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Will Caron
Rentals or fee simple?

After community concern over maintaining affordable housing units, Howard Hughes withdrew a request to switch the focus of one of its highrise projects from fee simple condos to rentals.

Developer Howard Hughes Corporation has withdrawn a request made to the Hawaiʻi Community Development Authority (HCDA) to switch the focus of its 988 Halekauwila highrise to affordable rentals instead of fee simple condos.

During an informational community meeting held last night, members of the public expressed concern that the request to focus on rentals was really a way for the developer to get away with building less affordable workforce housing than it initially promised in order to gain approval for the project.

But Howard Hughes Corp. Senior Vice President David Striph insisted that the company was not trying to lessen the number of affordable units it would have to build at 988 Halekauwila, or anywhere else in the Ward Village master plan.

Striph said that research conducted by the developer shows that there are five times more people interested in renting than in buying and that the company felt it should keep that in mind during the project’s planning.

HCDA executive director Tony Ching said the HCDA board is reviewing its reserve housing policy and that there could be changes ahead.

Howard Hughes plans to begin construction on 988 Halekauwila next year and is asking to build two more highrises at Ward Warehouse.

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Will Caron
Navigating a path to the future

The Native Hawaiian Convention will bring together community members to discuss policy that will held shape the future of the community.

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Will Caron
Oʻahu Intertribal Council Powwow

The Oʻahu Intertribal Council Powwow will transform Thomas Square into a gathering place for American Indians.

“Each dance has its own history; each dancer has a story to tell; each drum beat reunites everyone in spirit and purpose,” reads a tag line for the 40th annual Oʻahu Intertribal Council Powwow. On Saturday, October 4 and Sunday, October 5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thomas Square will be transformed into a gathering place for American Indians and Native Alaskans who live in Hawaiʻi as well as visiting American Indians from the mainland, Alaska and Canada.

The Honolulu Powwow gives Oʻahu residents an opportunity to experience the “sights, sounds, flavors, and spirit of Native America.” The theme this year is “Honoring Our Elders,” and the free event will feature dancing, drumming, singing, stories, American Indian & Native Alaskan handmade arts, crafts and jewelry as well as traditional native foods, such as fry bread and Indian Tacos.

The public is also invited to the Waikiki Community Center Intertribal Powwow on Wednesday October 1 from 4–9 p.m. A $5 donation will be asked for at the Waikīkī event.

The Honolulu Powwow is seeking volunteers as well—no experience required. For more information, email honolulupowwow@gmail.com or visit the Powwow website.

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Will Caron
Red Cross urges climate change preparedness

The disaster relief organization is calling on governments and international organizations at the Conference on Small Island Developing States to take concrete actions to reduce climate-change related disaster risks.

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Will Caron
Memorializing money-making?

A report by the National Parks Service shows that commercial tour operators have been taking advantage of the Arizona Memorial's free passes policy to make a profit, while under the less-than-watchful eyes of the memorial's operators.

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Will Caron
ALTRES Medical Announces Statewide Need for Nurses for Flu Season

ALTRES Medical seeks qualified nurses to work this flu season.

HONOLULU — Flu season typically reaches its peak in January and February but can last from October all the way to May. In preparation for this year’s season, ALTRES Medical, a supplemental nursing services practice, is seeking more than 300 registered nurses (RNs), nursing assistants (NAs) and medical assistants (MAs) to administer flu shots to Hawaii students and assist at school flu clinics statewide. ALTRES Medical is urging qualified applicants to apply now by visiting www.altresmedical.com.

For the last four years, ALTRES Medical has been chosen to manage the statewide flu clinics for the Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH). The “Stop Flu at School” influenza vaccination clinics will be held on public school and private school campuses on all islands.

“The ‘Stop Flu at School’ clinics are a wonderful opportunity for nurses of all levels of experience to serve their local communities,” said Jenies Thomas, manager of ALTRES Medical (pictured). “Nurses can choose to stay in the neighborhoods they live in, work nearby, or they can request to be assigned to communities with the greatest need.”

ALTRES Medical offers competitive pay to its employees with pay rates determined by medical license category.

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Will Caron
UN committee finds racial discrimination still prevalent in America

After the U.S. Human Rights Network presented information on continuing racial discrimination and human rights violations, the committee submitted a report with recommendations for the U.S. government.

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Will Caron
Garden Isle greenbacks

A look at the money being spent in Kauaʻi County’s legal battle to preserve Ordinance 960.

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Manjari Fergusson